This article was originally published on PRNews by Ian James Wright.

On Sept. 11, 2017, many organizations took to social media to make some sort of post commemorating the terrorist attacks of 2001. Most of them were some variation on the post below:

A photo of the “Tribute in Light” at Ground Zero, short words of remembrance, appropriate hashtag: These were the three main ingredients. And with good reason. Marking any tragedy, let alone one of the most tragic events to happen in the history of the United States, is not a time to make it “all about you.” For your average organization, this sort of tweet, while nothing groundbreaking, is appropriately somber and respectful.

In a few cases it is a good idea to insert your brand into the message is if you have something of value to offer that is intrinsic to the brand (and you have a clear-eyed perspective on what “value” means to the public). For example, NASA provided some unique images of Manhattan and Washington, D.C. from the International Space Station:

The History Channel linked to a story as part of its #ThisDayinHistory series, a fully on-brand tie-in that offered readers an overview from a well-known name in American history:

The account for the Statue of Liberty National Monument, run by the National Park Service, offered its readers comfort in the powerful symbolism of one of the nation’s most enduring icons standing watch over New York City:

This article was originally published on PRNews by Ian James Wright.

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